The Organized LifeThe Queen BeeThe Bee Has LandedCalming The HiveContact The Beekeeper

THE BEE HAS LANDED - and that is a good thing

It is my promise to you that I will help you achieve your organizing goals.  

Why hire a professional organizer?  The answer is simple I provide expertise, focus, leadership and humor (often all at the same time!)  I'm responsible for the plan of action and for keeping us on track and working toward your goals.  I also make certain that we are working on manageable projects and I watch carefully to make certain you remain energized and involved in the process.  

Why a bee?

I selected a bee to represent my business because she (90 percent of all bees are female) is a remarkable worker. She is efficient, industrious, and focused. She has been known to fly over five miles a day as she goes about her work (I wear a Fitbit, and let's just say I often exceed 5 miles a day) . Each action a bee takes produces an important outcome, whether it is directions to a fabulous food source, cooling for the hive or delicious honey.  I relate to the bee every time I work with a client.  It is my job to take care of the "hive" and to go confidently in the direction of my client's desired outcome.

Swarming

Nothing makes a beekeeper more nervous than her bees panicking and abandoning the hive.  A swarm forms when the bees no longer sense order.  My job is to help you avoid swarming and to gently guide you back to the hive with kindness, understanding and a plan.  Organizing can be a challenging process, but with the right leadership and experience, it can be a rewarding and life-changing experience.

Assessing the Hive and Cost of Honey (fee structure)

I will gather quite a bit of information during our email correspondence or initial phone call.  I'll ask lots of questions and listen intently.  If you are ready to move forward, we'll get an appointment scheduled.   My fee structure is simple:  I charge $70/hour for residental clients and $90/hour for corporate/coaching clients.  Why the difference?  The corporate world requires more time, research, and involves more moving parts. And, depending on where you are located, there may be a travel fee, which we will discuss right away so there are no surprises.

The Buzz in Books

Clients often ask me to recommend a good book...or two...or three about the organizing process.   Here are a few of my favorites (click on the title and you will be taken to Amazon's website where you can read more about the book):

It's All Too Much, by Peter Walsh

The More of Less, by Joshua Becker

Organizing from the Inside Out, by Julie Morgenstern

ADD Friendly Ways to Organize Your LIfe, by Judith Kolberg andKathleen Nadeau

Organized for Success, by Stephanie Winston

The Organized Student, by Donna Golberg

Making Time Work for You, by Harold Taylor

Crazy Busy by Edward M Hallowell, MD

The Power of Habit, by Charles Duhigg

Daring Greatly, by Brene Brown

Better Than Before, by Gretchen Rubin

The Organized Admin, by Julie Perrine

The Myth of Multitasking, by Dave Crenshaw 

 

 

 


 

 

 

THE QUEEN BEE IN THE NEWS
 
Want to know more about me?  Here are articles written over the past 11 years either by me or others about the work I do.

 

Life is a Marathon, Not a Sprint, by Maggie Jackson

Meaningful Work Results in a Meaningful Life, by Maggie Mowrey March 2014

Serendipity, Synchronicity & Surprise, by Maggie Mowrey August 2010

Cut The Clutter, by Maggie Jackson - Modern Woodman Magazine, Spring 2010

T'is The Season for Being Stressed, by Gale Mote December 2009

Flying Solo, a book by Diane Quintana - Foreword written by Maggie Jackson 2009

Set Your Own Balance, The Gazette June 6, 2008

Business Card - Maggie Jackson, The Gazette March 10, 2008

Queen Bee Buzzes Through MMC, Mount Mercy Times February 20, 2008

Toys More Fun When They Can Find Them, The Gazette September 16, 2007

Cluttered Lives Spawn New Profession, The Gazette April 15, 2007

One In, One Out, The Gazette February 11, 2007

Pare and Share, The Gazette December 20, 2006

Out With The Old, The Gazette February 27, 2006